America’s long-established 20% tipping rule has been going through an existential crisis lately, but the dilemma of how much gratuity to leave—if any at all—is one that has long plagued travelers going abroad. Say you have just enjoyed a delicious meal in a foreign city—depending on where you are, what you might consider a straightforward tip might be too much, too little, or even downright insulting. Plus, trying to find answers on Google just leads you down a message-board rabbit hole with no real clarity.

So in the spirit of comfortable, pleasant, and culturally respectful travel, we’ve compiled a list of tipping guidelines for countries around the world. Note that in almost all the places on this list, you should tip in the local currency. And cash is always king.

EUROPE

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Provence, France

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France:

Most restaurant bills include a service charge (service compris) so a tip isn’t necessary but you can choose to round up, leave the change, or, tip up to 10% for great service. Taxi drivers should get 10% to 15% for longer rides and a few euros (or round up) for short trips and private drivers between 10 20 euros. Plus, have a few euros handy for bellhops, housekeepers, and room service.

Italy:

A service fee is often included in restaurant checks so tipping isn’t necessary. If you want, you can round up or leave as much as 10% for really good service. While it’s not necessary to tip taxi drivers but if they help with luggage and such, feel free to offer 1 to 2 euros or round up the fare. For walking tours and gondoliers, tips aren’t necessary. A few euros should also be saved for hotel attendants who help with luggage, housekeeping, and room service waiters.

Germany:

A service charge accompanies all restaurant checks but you can round up to the nearest euro or leave about 10# to 15% for really excellent service. Just remember to hand the money directly to your waiter or waitress—leaving it on the table is considered rude. Round up for taxi fares and allot a few euros for bellhops, housekeeping, and room service.

Ireland:

Tipping isn’t necessary if the restaurant has added a service charge. If not, tip 10%. Round up for taxi fares and allot a few euros for bellhops, housekeeping, and room service.

Spain:

For casual tapas bars, it’s fine to round up the bill to the nearest euro. Even restaurants don’t require a tip but feel free to leave 5% to 10% for good service. Taxi fares can also be rounded up and leave a few euros for bellhops, housekeeping, and room service.

Portugal:

A 5% to 10% tip will be well-received in restaurants. Round up for taxi fares and allot a few euros for bellhops, housekeeping, and room service.

Switzerland:

As in France, restaurants here generally include a service charge. You can choose to round up to the nearest Swiss franc or leave about 5% to 10%. Do the same for taxi drivers and have a few CHF for hotel staff.

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Dubrovnik, Croatia

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Croatia:

A 10% to 15% tip is standard for nice restaurants, while you can leave the change in cafes and tip up to 5% for more casual meals. Tip porters and housekeeping staff in Croatian Kuna and round up for taxi fares.

United Kingdom:

If a service charge isn’t included in your bill, add 10% to 15%. Round up for taxis or have the drivers keep the change. Save some pounds for hotel staff who help with luggage, and for housekeeping.

Greece:

Five to 10% is standard in restaurants. It’s also the same percentage you should plan to tip for yacht charters (put the money in an envelope). Taxi fares can be rounded up and porters and housekeeping should also be tipped.

Austria:

A service charge is usually included in restaurant bills so feel free to round up or leave up to 10% if you really enjoyed the experience. Round up taxi fares and save a few euros for porters and maids.

Netherlands:

It’s not required to leave a tip in restaurants but you can opt for 5% to 10% if you really liked the service, though rounding up is fine, too. Taxi fares can also be rounded up and since service charges are added to hotel bills as well, it’s up to you if you want to leave something extra for its staff though it’s always nice to give porters a few euros.

Belgium:

Tipping in restaurants is not expected because of service charges already added to the check. You can round up if you please, and the same goes for taxi fares. Hotel costs also include service so it’s not necessary to tip housekeepers, though it would be nice to give a few euros to porters.

Scandinavia (Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Iceland, Finland):

There is no tipping culture in this region, so don’t feel obliged to leave anything extra after meals, for hotel staff, or for drivers. Service is included in all of these costs.

Hungary:

If a service fee hasn’t been added to your restaurant bill, plan to tip 10% to 15%. Hotel staff also expect tips in forints so have them handy for porters, maids, waitstaff, etc. Taxi drivers should also be tipped 5% to 10%.

Russia:

A 10% to 15% cash tip for the waiter is standard (but don’t leave it on the table—give it directly to your server) and hotel porters and maids should be tipped as well in rubles. Always negotiate fares before getting into a taxi and at the end of your ride, tip drivers 10%.

AFRICA

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Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

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Tanzania:

If you’re going on safari, check with your tour operator for their tipping guidelines. In restaurants, 5% will be appreciated. Hotel porters and housekeeping should be tipped, too, but only after you check with the hotel about their policies. Taxi fares can be rounded up or you can tip drivers up to 10% if they were particularly helpful.

Kenya:

A 10% tip at restaurants is the norm, and money should be handed directly to your server. Taxi drivers will appreciate you leaving the change or rounding up the fare, while porters and housekeeping should be tipped.

South Africa:

Ten to 15% is the standard for restaurants and bars, and taxi drivers should be tipped 10%. Also make sure to tip porters and maids in Rands.

Morocco:

If a service charge hasn’t been added to your restaurant bill, up to 10% is a nice gesture. Leaving 20 to 30 dirhams (the equivalent of $2 to $3) is also just fine. Tipping porters and housekeeping staff is customary, and round up taxi fares.

Botswana:

As with Tanzania, check with safari operators for tipping guidelines. For restaurants, if you’re happy with the service, a 10% tip is standard. Porters and maids should be tipped as well. For taxi drivers, you can round up the fare or tip 10% for longer rides.

Seychelles:

Restaurant bills will usually include a service charge but giving a little something more will be appreciated. Taxi drivers also don’t expect tips but you can round up. Tipping hotel porters and housekeeping staff is also a nice gesture.

ASIA & MIDDLE EAST

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Bukchon Hanok Village, Seoul, South Korea

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South Korea:

Tipping isn’t part of the culture here, but you can round up taxi fares and allot a couple thousand won (1 USD=1,200 won) for hotel porters and housekeeping.

Japan:

This one is easy. Do not tip anywhere, not in restaurants, hotels, or taxis. It can be considered rude!

Bhutan:

Hotels and restaurants add a 20% service charge so tipping is not required but small gestures for hotel porters and maids will be appreciated. If you are hiring guides and drivers to take you around, plan to give about $15 and $10 per day, respectively.

China:

Like Japan, there is no tipping in China, with one exception: the porters at international hotels who take up your luggage.

Hong Kong:

A 10% fee is added to most restaurant bills so tipping isn’t required, but you can leave 5% to 10% for great service. Have taxi drivers keep the change and keep an eye out for service charges on hotel bills—if there is one, porters should still be given tips for carrying luggage but not housekeeping.

Singapore:

A service charge is usually included in restaurant checks so no tip is necessary, though it’s fine to leave something small if you want. No need to tip in hawker centers. Round up taxi fare and tip hotel porters who help with bags. Tipping housekeeping staff is not required but could be a nice gesture. And never tip anyone at Changi airport—staff are forbidden from accepting any gratuities.

Philippines:

Leave a 10% tip in restaurants only if you see that a service charge has not been added to the bill. Taxi drivers should also get 10%. In hotels, porters should be given a tip for handling your bags, and if you want to give your housekeeping staff some Philippine pesos, it’s best to do it in person or to leave it in an envelope in your room.

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Taipei, Taiwan

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Taiwan:

Check to see if your restaurant bill includes a service charge. If not, tip 10% to 15%. Taxi drivers don’t expect tips but you should have Taiwanese dollars for porters and housekeeping.

Thailand:

Like in the Philippines, leave a 10% tip in nice restaurants if there isn’t a service charge. Taxi fares can simply be rounded up (or have drivers keep the change), and porters will always appreciate tips in baht. Most hotels incorporate a service fee so tipping housekeeping staff isn’t necessary.

Indonesia:

A 10% tip is included in restaurants but you can leave the change if you want. Likewise, a 10 service charge will show up on your hotel bill so tipping porters and housekeeping staff isn’t required, though they will certainly appreciate small gestures. Round up on taxi fare.

India:

Leave a 10% tip in restaurants if you don’t see a service charge on the check. Keep rupees handy for hotel porters and housekeeping, and round up taxi fares.

Maldives:

Most restaurants will include a service charge so it’s up to you whether you want to leave a small token for your waiter. Hotel porters and housekeepers will also always appreciate tips. (Keep in mind people prefer to be paid in USD here.) Since most of your transportation will be done via private boat or seaplane, tips are not necessary. Diving guides and other activity teachers also need not be tipped unless you really want to (then 10%).

Jordan:

A service charge is generally included in the bill but you should add 5% to 10%. Have a few dinars for hotel porters and housekeeping, and feel free to round up metered taxi fares. For private drivers and official guides, be sure to agree upon a set price beforehand and keep that receipt to avoid anyone refusing you service unless he is given more money.

UAE:

In Dubai, a 10% service charge is added to all restaurant, hotel, and bar tabs. Leave a few dirhams to show appreciation if you wish (for hotel porters and maids, too), and round up taxi fares.

Qatar:

A 10% to 15% tip at restaurants is standard, unless a service charge has already been added to the bill. Leave riyals for porters and housekeeping, and round up taxi fares.

OCEANIA

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Akaroa, New Zealand

Robin SmithGetty Images

New Zealand:

Tips aren’t expected in restaurants because waitstaff make fair wages. If you loved your service, though, you can leave a maximum 10% tip. For taxis, have the driver keep the change at most—it’s not uncommon for them to refuse anything more.

Australia:

As with New Zealand, tips aren’t expected in restaurants or for taxi rides but if you are happy with your service you can round up, leave a few Australian dollars, or tip up to 10%. Also allot some money for anyone at the hotel who helps with your bags, along with a few dollars for housekeeping.

French Polynesia & Fiji:

Tipping is not expected anywhere. For restaurants and taxi rides, you can round up if you want to give something extra. Certain hotels will have a “Christmas Fund” box that you can contribute to

NORTH & SOUTH AMERICA

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Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

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Canada:

Consider restaurant tipping rules to be the same as those in the states, 15% to 20%. Taxi drivers should get 10% to 15% and have a few Canadian dollars for bellhops, housekeeping, and room service.

Mexico:

A 10% to 15% tip is now customary at restaurants but keep an eye out for a 10% service charges that certain restaurants will put on your bill. You can round up taxi fares but always tip porters and housekeeping.

Costa Rica:

Tips are already included in most restaurant bills but if not, 10% to 15% is standard. Round up on taxi fares and tip maids and porters.

Puerto Rico:

Follow the same tipping guidelines as the U.S. but always check restaurant bills for service charges first.

Bermuda:

Most restaurants will add service charge to their bills. If they haven’t, 15%is the standard. For everything else, follow U.S. tipping guidelines.

Jamaica:

Locals don’t tip, but tourists, especially in popular areas, will leave about 10% to 20%. But be sure to check that a service charge hasn’t already been included—if it has, how much extra to leave is totally up to you. Certain all-inclusive hotels forbid their staff from taking tips so check with the concierge before leaving gratuities. Also double check your hotel bill for any added service charges. Round up taxi fares.

Bahamas:

Most restaurants charge a 15% service fee. If they don’t, a 15% tip is standard. Taxi fares can be rounded up and hotel maids and porters should be tipped.

Cuba:

A 10% to 15% tip is the norm for restaurants. Taxi drivers, hotel porters, and housekeeping should be tipped in Cuban pesos as well.

Dominican Republic:

For restaurants and taxis, if a 10% service charge hasn’t already been added, it’s customary to leave that much for waitstaff and drivers. Hotel porters and housekeeping should be tipped.

Turks & Caicos, Anguilla, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia:

Most restaurants will add a 10% service charge. If so, adding an additional 5% to 10% will be greatly appreciated. Tip porters and maids, too, and taxi drivers should also be tipped about 10%.

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Cartagena, Colombia

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Colombia:

Most restaurants will tack on a 10% to 15% service charge so tipping isn’t necessary. You can leave a little something extra if you were pleased with the service. Taxi drivers also don’t require tips but maids and porters should be tipped in Colombian pesos.

Brazil:

A 10% service charge is generally always added to the restaurant bill so there is no pay extra. Housekeeping staff and porters should be tipped, though, and it’s okay to round up taxi fares. Here, USD is encouraged.

Peru:

A 10% tip is the general rule of thumb in restaurants. You can go up to 15% if you really loved the service. Taxi fares are usually negotiated beforehand so there is no need to add extra. Tip hotel porters and housekeeping.

Chile:

Many restaurants already add a 10% service charge (and some also add a 5% sit-down fee) but it’s still customary to add another 5% to 10% tip on top of that. Hotel maids and porters should be tipped as well while it’s fine to round up your taxi fare.

Argentina:

A 10% tip is standard for restaurants. Taxi drivers, on the other hand, don’t expect tips but it’s nice to leave the change or round up (and offer a little more if they have helped with bags). Hotel porters and maids should be tipped in pesos.



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